What to Expect in Moonlighting: An Oral History by Scott Ryan

What to Expect in Moonlighting: An Oral History by Scott Ryan

If you’re someone who devours new television shows, are the go-to person for recommendations among your friends, and want to hold your fame, you’ve got to read this. You’re about to earn some serious brownie points by being the first to know all about the 80s iconic show, Moonlighting. Here’s a little chat with pop culture storyteller and television historian Scott Ryan.

Hi Scott, your latest book, “Moonlighting: An Oral History,” still holds its position on the top 50 Television History & Criticism books on Amazon since its release. Congratulations!

How’s the overall response so far? 

It has been incredible. I have been getting emails almost every other day from fans of the series. I always put my email in the back of all my books and say that if you have a kind email to send, send it. I do not have interest in the mean ones. Most bookstores have not been carrying the book, so we need more stores to jump on the eighties bandwagon.

Why did you choose to write about Moonlighting?

 I have always been amazed that no one had ever written a book about it.  I have wanted to write this book for years. Finally, two years ago, Glenn Caron gave me his blessing and I ran with it.

Would you say this book is mainly for those who are fans of the show?

Well, you are asking the author. No author would say his book is for less people. But I honestly believe this book should be read by all television lovers. This will really explain to viewers how hard it is to create a piece of art. And how much harder it is to make a quality piece of art. I have had many interviewers tell me that they never saw an episode of the series, but they loved the book.

What can you share about “Moonlighting: An Oral History” that will resonate with today’s television viewers and potential readers?

I think they will get a look at how Moonlighting changed the way TV was made and produced. It is also a great reminder at how viewers want TV that challenges them. That making average TV should be thought of as the greatest crime. There is a really amazing story in this book. I was lucky to get to tell it.

Can you share some of your fanboy moments from your time meeting and interviewing some of Moonlighting’s cast/crew members? 

Look, I got to watch an episode of Moonlighting with Cybill Shepherd. We watched over zoom together. I will never forget that my entire life. Jay Daniel produced Roseanne, Moonlighting, Cybill and he is now one of my dear friends. I have been blessed to talk to the very  people that inspired me to be a writer. I will never get over how my life and their lives  intersected. This entire process has been a dream for me.

What’s the one thing you learned about Moonlighting that bowled you over?

That the network just let them spend as much money as they wanted. There was no one on set telling them to finish an episode, or cut a scene or anything. They were just left alone because the ratings were so good. I also finally figured out exactly how they filmed Season 4. I have never understood why they didn’t have Cybill and Bruce in scenes together, but they are in every episode. It just didn’t make sense. It took lots of interviews to piece together the filming sequences. But I think readers will love the answer to that question. I am not telling you, though. You’ll have to read the book.

Aside from Moonlighting, what are some of your favorite binge-able shows of all time? 

Well Twin Peaks and thirtysomething have always been my favorite. I also love anything by David E. Kelley. Right now, I love Hacks on HBO, Good Fight on Paramount + and Ted Lasso on Apple +, but my goodness, who can afford to buy all those platforms. Just forget it and read my book.

Ready for some rapid-fire questions? Here we go:

Morning person or a night owl 

Morning person (that kills me to say that now)

Television shows or movies 

TV all the way

Movie theatre or streaming at home

 Streaming, I don’t need to hear a stranger’s comments on the film. I am fine.

Popcorn or Nachos

 Nachos and piled so high they are messy.

Night Court or Family Ties

 WOW. This is an amazing question and a stumper. It is basically even, but I was so in love with Mallory, that FT has to win. But great question.

A preferred writing snack

 Grapes. I know that sounds weird, but I love to stop and start when I am writing. I adore getting up and getting something. So I love for it to be grapes. You write a few paragraphs, then you go to the fridge, get a grape and go back and sit down and then rinse and repeat.

What was the last movie you watched?

 Jackie Brown. Which will give you a hint at what I want my next book to be about. The Movies of Tarantino.

Solving Mysteries in Real-Life and Fiction: T L Bequette

Solving Mysteries in Real-Life and Fiction: T L Bequette

Hi T L Bequette, congrats on your first novel, “Good Lookin’: A Joe Turner Mystery.” We’re so excited to hear more about you and the book. Let’s get to it.

As a criminal defense attorney, your practice involves defending accused murderers. How did you shift gears and decide to write fiction?

I’ve always loved to write creatively. As an attorney, I have plenty of opportunities to write, but creativity is generally frowned upon. You can’t make up the law, after all. So, when I finally stopped making excuses and started writing, it was a wonderful feeling—like seeing an old friend for the first time in years.

How did Joe Turner start to take shape in your mind? When did you know you had to get the story out there? 

I’ve practiced criminal defense for nearly thirty years, so my job has given me quite a trove of real-life tales that are often crazier than fiction. Also, a significant part of the book follows the exploits of twin boys. As a father of teenage twins, I’ve gained some insight there as well. They would disagree, by the way

Book cover of Good Lookin' by T L Bequette
Available on Amazon

In “Good Lookin’: A Joe Turner Mystery,” how much of it would you say is fiction and how much of it is derived from real life? 

The protagonist, Joe Turner is a criminal defense attorney like me. When faced with defending a client who is actually innocent, he stresses out and drinks too much. Also, a bit like me, I suppose. Joe is also a smartass and very witty—like I would be if I could magically stop conversations and take lots of time to think of great lines.

If you weren’t a criminal defense attorney, would you still write a crime mystery? Do you want to explore other genres?

That’s a great question. I’ve thought about other genres, but I have so much material and stories yet to tell, I think mysteries will keep me busy for a while.

If you have a chance to partner with Netflix, who would you like cast for as Joe Turner? 

Kyle Chandler, I think. He’s likeable.

Besides the real-life observations, where do you draw your inspiration from?

In my genre, Louise Penny is a wonderful writer. Also, you can’t beat John Grisham for storytelling.

Without giving much away, can you think of the one scene that made you go, “Ah, this is perfect!” 

Is it okay to have two? The first involves an abusive bully. Spoiler alert, I suppose, but let’s just say I enjoyed writing the resolution of that part of the story. Also, there is one final twist in the very last line of the book. I think it’s cool.

T. L. Bequette

Here are some rapid-fire questions for you. Answer with the first thought that comes to your mind. Ready? Let’s go. 

Tea or Coffee

Coffee

‘Rear Window’ or ‘L.A. Confidential’

Rear Window

Jazz or Country Music

Country

Prefer writing in the morning or late at night

Early am

Video Game or Movie

Movie

What’s the one thing you learned when writing the book? 

That organization — keeping plot lines and characters straight — is an underrated part of writing.

Tell us one thing about yourself that we likely don’t know. 

I once worked in the largest prune dehydrator in the world.

Meet the Author of Harry Harambee’s Kenyan Sundowner

Meet the Author of Harry Harambee’s Kenyan Sundowner

Gerald Everett Jones’ latest book takes us across to the Sub-Saharan African Country of Kenya. The award-winning author effortlessly transforms his readers’ experience from being passive observers to find themselves thoroughly invested in this journey. Here’s what he shares about himself and his new book, “Harry Harambee’s Kenyan Sundowner.”

Hi Gerald, you tell us about your new book, “Harry Harambee’s Kenyan Sundowner”? 

A lonely widower from Los Angeles buys a tour package to East Africa on the promise of hookups and parties. What he finds instead are new reasons to live.

Aldo Barbieri, a slick Italian tour operator, convinces Harry to join a group of adventuresome “voluntourists.” In a resort town on the Indian Ocean, Harry doesn’t find the promised excitement with local ladies. But in the supermarket he meets Esther Mwemba, a demure widow who works as a bookkeeper. The attraction is strong and mutual, but Harry gets worried when he finds out that Esther and Aldo have a history. They introduce him to Victor Skebelsky, rumored to be the meanest man in town. Skebelsky has a plan to convert his grand colonial home and residential compound into a rehab center – as a tax dodge. The scheme calls for Harry to head up the charity. He could live like a wealthy diplomat and it won’t cost him a shilling!

Harry has to come to terms with questions at the heart of his character: Is corruption a fact of life everywhere? Is all love transactional?

Who would enjoy reading it the most? Why? 

Fans of literary fiction who aren’t locked into any particular genre. I believe the fascination of literary fiction is to get inside a flawed character who is forced to dig deep into his soul. He’s not necessarily someone worthy of admiration, but we may be impressed by his courage. We might see ourselves differently as a result. And as we follow him through the strory, we go through his painful discoveries without having to look too closely at ourselves in the process. But in the end, we know we all face the same questions and anxieties.

How do the characters from the book come alive? What makes them so appealing?

Harry sets out as a tourist, a passive observer. He watches the world from the backseat of an excursion vehicle. But then when he develops an emotional attachment and decides to stay in-country, he must begin to think like a resident, like a citizen. He must decide how much he is willing to become involved, how much he’s willing to commit. There’s bravery in his decision.

What are some of your cherished moments from your time in Kenya that may or may not have made their way in “Harry Harambee’s Kenyan Sundowner”?

Most of the time, my wife lived in Diani Beach, a small resort town on the white sands of the Indian Ocean. Some of my favorite times were Sunday afternoons at Forty Thieves Bar and Grill on the beach. It was a buffet for ten bucks. Almost everyone you knew in town dropped in at some time. There was a band playing, alternating American pop coverage with authentic South African rhythms. We all sat there, gossiping, eating, and drinking until the sun went down. And our two terriers amused themselves endlessly chasing crabs in the surf. (This scene isn’t in the book!)

If it is made into a movie, who do you think should play Harry Harambee’s character?

Christian Bale has proven he can play just about anybody, but think of him plumped up with thinning hair as he was to play Dick Cheney. But with more affability and heart. I describe Harry as a bit pudgy, something of a couch potato, but with a friendliness and charm. Then again, Jack Nicholson just the way he shows up these days?

Mystery-thrillers or literary fiction, what do you enjoy writing the most? Why?

I prefer to write literary fiction because there are no rules. Almost none at all. But I enjoy writing mystery-thrillers because after I get going, I let myself go and let the characters make the decisions. And the ending is always a surprise, to me and I hope to the readers.

What are you reading, watching, and loving? Any recommendations?

After I started writing the book, I realized its similarities of setting and expat intrigue with The Heart of the Matter by Graham Greene (set it Sierra Leone) and The Constant Gardener by John Le Carré (set in Kenya). I reread both of those recently, and the movie of Gardener is well done. There’s also a movie of the Greene story. It’s available to stream on Amazon and I intend to watch it for the first time soon.

Rapid Fire time! Answer the following questions with the first thing that comes to your mind.   

Orange juice or Coffee

Organic French Roast. At least two cups with soymilk first thing in the morning.

Writing in silence or with music

I’m a music lover – mostly classical and jazz, and especially opera. But if I listen while I’m writing my head gets jammed and it’s a distraction.

Kindle or Paperback 

Kindle especially when traveling. Paperbacks when making notes, especially for research. I love a paper book, but if I get one I have to gift it because I just don’t have the space to hold them all. That’s another reason for Kindle – a thousand books in your library in the cloud.

Podcast or Video 

When I’m recording a podcast in the studio, I love the sound of my voice in the headphones, and I relax. I enjoy doing video but I tend to be both animated and self-conscious at the same time.

One item from your “bucket” list you’d like to share

I’ve often thought of investing in an art gallery on Canyon Drive in Santa Fe. I’d work there part time, but never miss the parties on openings. I’m not sure my wife is ready to let me do this, though.

Favorite holiday destination

I lived in Paris on the Left Bank for a time as a student. Never bored going back. My French has gotten better. They now accuse me of being either Belgian or British. They know I’m not local! My wife Georja went to school in Rome, and that’s at least one place where I shut up and let her talk.

A favorite author you’d love to meet

I’d love to have a leisurely chat with Hypatia of Alexandria. And I’ll ask her what she thinks of the book I wrote about her. Most of her writings have been lost, so I’m sure the conversation would be revealing – particularly regarding who destroyed them and why.

A Look Inside Moonlighting

A Look Inside Moonlighting

The Gossip We Have All Been Waiting For

In Moonlighting: An Oral History, Scott Ryan investigates the underlying drama behind the show that pioneered network TV as we know it today. He first introduced his idea of this investigation to the creator, Glenn Gordon Caron, who was more than happy to give his blessing and reminisce about series. Then he corralled the rest of the writers, cast members, editors, and anyone else he could find. He made them the promise of writing this book with a balance between memories and facts, all to remember the beloved show that made pop culture history.

This ABC-TV series was the first successful comedy-drama of its time, featuring Cybill Shepherd as Maddie and Bruce Willis as David. It follows Maddie, an ex-model recently bankrupt, who is persuaded by David to run Blue Moon Investigations as co-partners. Everyone fell in love with their bickering and flirtatious interactions, anxiously waiting for them to give into the romance. When the episode finally came for them to consummate their relationship, audiences had already been waiting for two and a half years. This season 3 episode was the peak of the show and brought the highest ratings yet.

Ryan explains how this is where the mystery of Moonlighting’s downfall heightens. Each chapter follows a different point in time within the airing of the show. Ryan first sets the stage with a short blurb about the filming environment of the episode and then lets his interviewees takeover. By expertly organizing the detailed notes he took while speaking to them, he crafts an intriguing story. From cast members such as Cybill Shepherd and Allyce Beasley, to writers such as Glenn Gordon Caron and Jay Daniel, the only person missing is Bruce Willis. That being said, the remarks compiled from everyone else certainly create an unforgettable tale of Moonlighting.

For the first few seasons, the show received excellent ratings and had the full attention of both its co-stars. After the third season, things started to spin out of control. While many fans claim that the show went downhill after Maddie and David finally consummated their relationship, Ryan’s interviews prove otherwise. For example, Caron details how he made this plot decision before finding out that Cybill was going to take a year long absence from the show. At the same time, Bruce was whisked away to make Die Hard. To top it all off, when the couple finally reunited under Roger Director’s writing, ABC shut them down.

This compilation of interviews gives all the juicy details you never knew to look for, such as how both leads had doubles for a certain scene where Shepherd was pregnant with twins and Willis had a broken collarbone. The crew recounts many scenes and episodes that seem unbelievable to the point where they question if it had really happened. Ryan makes the distinction that he did not undergo critical analysis of the series, rather an investigation into its creative process. With his interpretation of the interviews and a sprinkle of relevant facts, he creates an oral history of Moonlighting that will not be soon forgotten. Pre-Order your copy of Moonlighting; an Oral History now.

Dr. Janet Brill’s Guide to Intermittent Fasting

Dr. Janet Brill’s Guide to Intermittent Fasting

Are you curious about Intermittent fasting and thinking about giving it a fair shot? Before you jump right in, grab your copy of “Intermittent Fasting for Dummies” by Dr. Janet Brill. So you know how it’s done and also what to expect as you adopt a new lifestyle.

Here’s what Dr. Janet Brill shared about her newly released book and personal experience with Intermittent Fasting as a way of life.

Dr. Janet Brill, how would you explain what Intermittent Fasting is to someone who thinks it’s only for fitness fanatics? 

Intermittent fasting is an eating pattern that cycles between periods of short-term fasting and eating. There are multiple intermittent fasting diet plans circulating. All of them dictate when you should eat rather than what specific foods you should eat. One popular version, called the 16:8 method, means you fast for 16 hours every day and eat during your chosen 8 hour eating window. You repeat this pattern of eating every day. However, for long-term health benefits, it is highly recommended that you don’t ignore the “what to eat” part of this eating regimen. As a nutritionist, it is suggested that you combine a plant-based, Mediterranean style of eating with your intermittent fasting plan of choice.

Dr. Janet Brill

Intermittent fasting is a lifestyle, not a fad diet. Intermittent fasting is for all individuals seeking to improve their health (and who do not fall into the category of people who should NOT follow such a plan), not just health and fitness fanatics. Numerous scientific studies have shown that intermittent fasting programs can have powerful benefits for your body and brain. In fact, intermittent fasting appears to be a veritable fountain of youth, lowering body weight, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, improving glucose control, reducing inflammation and even fighting aging and boosting mental acuity.

Oftentimes, people want to know how long you can stay on a program of intermittent fasting. If you are eating nutritious food and can maintain a healthy weight, you can eat this way indefinitely.

When did you get the idea to write “Intermittent Fasting for Dummies”? How long did the research take?

The New England Journal of Medicine came out with a review article on intermittent fasting on December 26, 2019. In early 2020, I read the article and became fascinated with the conclusion: intermittent-fasting interventions can effectively treat obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and inflammation. In fact, intermittent fasting was shown to confer health benefits to a greater extent than that attributed just to just weight loss. Serendipitously, my literary agent contacted me and said Wiley was looking for a writer for just that topic—would I be interested? The research took me six months.

What is one of the most astonishing case-studies you’ve come across during your research?

Although not a single case study, I am probably most astonished by the conclusions of a scientific review article published in 2014 in the journal Translational Research and titled: “Intermittent fasting vs daily calorie restriction for type 2 diabetes prevention: a review of human findings.” The review showed that intermittent fasting programs over 3–24-week periods can cause weight loss of between 3–8% weight. Furthermore, the review showed that intermittent fasting regimens target harmful belly fat, with data showing loss of 4–7% of their waist circumference—which is truly extraordinary.

As the title suggests, is “Intermittent Fasting for Dummies” just for the beginners or can it also benefit those who are already on a plan?  

Yes, those already on the plan should read my book as a primer for how to follow this lifestyle in a safe and healthy way. My book differs from most other books or internet recommendations on how to follow a program of intermittent fasting. Many of them dictate when you should eat rather than what specific foods you should eat. Others pair an extremely unhealthy keto diet with the program.  As a health and wellness professional, I give dietary recommendations for pairing the plan with the healthiest diet, a green, plant-based Mediterranean eating regimen. I also give safe exercise recommendations as well as dictate who should NOT follow a program of intermittent fasting. I also give lots of helpful tips and tricks to keep people motivated and to help them adhere to this new healthy lifestyle.

Intermittent fasting is safe for most people, but it’s not for everyone. If you have a medical condition, you must get medical clearance to follow a program of intermittent fasting, especially if you have:

diabetes or problems with blood sugar regulation; have high or low blood pressure; take prescription medications (people who take medications for blood pressure or heart disease may be more prone to electrolyte abnormalities from fasting); or are underweight. Intermittent fasting should NOT be practiced by children; people with a history of eating disorders; women who are trying to conceive; women who are pregnant or breastfeeding and uncontrolled diabetics.

What is the best comment you have received about your book so far? 

Available on Amazon

☆☆☆☆☆ 5 out of 5 stars.      

Absolute One-Stop Guide To Intermittent Fasting

The absolute one-stop guide to intermittent fasting. I have been curious about this newest eating craze and wondering if it might be right for me. I love how this guide breaks it all down into multiple sections for easy reference. It gives the rationale and science behind fasting. It provides cautions and things to consider before starting. So many questions are covered and answered, I felt like I was able to just reach out and ask and I would find the answer somewhere in the pages. I especially appreciated the section that broke down the different types of intermittent fasting plans. Knowing how to incorporate exercise into this eating plan is crucial and due justice is given to this topic. If you are considering this way of eating, or are just curious about the premise, this is the book you are looking for! 

We hear that you practice Intermittent Fasting. What are the three things that helped you the most when you were starting off? 

Black coffee, water and staying busy writing and researching this book!

What is your guilty pleasure?

Red wine and chocolate (during my eating periods—of course!).

Post COVID-19, how do we keep on track with our diet as we travel? 

The most wonderful aspect of intermittent fasting is the freedom to eat during the feasting periods without counting calories or feeling like you must sacrifice taste (just be sure not to overdo it and have crazy junk food calorie-laden eat–fests during your eating periods or you will not get results and will negate the health benefits!). Traveling will be easy, just eat during your eating windows.

What is your favorite recipe from the book? 

Lentil soup. All of us needs to eat a plant-based diet for better health. Lentils have been part of the culinary culture of the Mediterranean throughout the ages. These seeds may be petite, but they are nutrition giants, loaded with the heart healthiest of ingredients including fiber, antioxidants, plant protein, vitamins, minerals, and iron—and all this for just pennies on the dollar. What’s more, eating legumes such as lentils might just be the dietary secret to longevity. Studies show that people who eat a diet rich in legumes live longer. Lentils and other legumes are nutritional powerhouses loaded with plant protein—as legumes are Mother Nature’s healthy version of meat—you get a nice dose of plant protein but without any of the artery-clogging excess baggage that goes along with animal protein (saturated fat and cholesterol). Plus, you get fiber, vitamins, minerals, and strong antioxidants as a bonus. The fact is that Americans eat too much animal protein, which tends to be at the center of our plate at breakfast, lunch, and dinner.  

Try this delicious lentil soup with a loaf of crusty whole grain bread (for dipping)–a spectacularly delicious and nutritious meal!

Explore the Immersive Dystopia of the Internet With Edgar Scott

Explore the Immersive Dystopia of the Internet With Edgar Scott

Technology and innovation drive our society towards a better tomorrow. But, what if someone misused the inventions? Edgar Scott presents a case of technology gone wrong in his upcoming dystopian sci-fi novel, “418: I Am a Teapot.” But is there light at the end of the tunnel? We’re about to find out.

Edgar Scott shares his technical insights, personal views, and scoops from 418 in a candid interview.

What does the title, “418: I am a Teapot” mean and how does it relate to theme of the book?

The title 418 actually refers to an HTTP response code.  While its introduction was originally an April Fool’s joke, the “418 I’m a Teapot” response is usually ignored by web browsers; unlike a “404 Not Found” response.  A crafty network admin may configure a server to issue a 418 response which allows the visitor to use the site while the 418 response is recorded in the server logs for programmers to analyze.  

In today’s internet, we often program web services to have different roles, authentication, handling tokens, access data sources in addition to rendering HTML.  Often what appears to be an entire web server is little more than a program written to respond to specific requests.  In the novel “418: I am a teapot” we have immersive internet, which implies programmability.  A practical aspect of 418’s world is that, to pay for being on the internet 24/7, we have to be programmed to carry out tasks.  Happily, if we are in the immersive internet, we won’t even be aware what we are doing; we don’t need any skill to do what we are programmed to do and are paid accordingly. 

In such a world, where you are not even aware of what we do, we might as well be a teapot. In fact, our protagonist, may have actually been a virtual teapot or a proverbial coffee maker, without even knowing it.

Why did you choose to write a dystopian sci-fi novel?

Edgar Scott

Having watched new technology, which normally improves our lives, think of all the truly mind shattering things that we can now do with computers, mobile devices, wearable tech.  I can tell if my heart is beating properly, I know exactly how long my morning run was or how to avoid getting stuck in traffic.  While I love new technology, coding, and toying with computers, I wanted to issue a warning that not always is everything as rosy as it appears at first blush.  I felt compelled to write this novel because technology can be abused.  It could be used to exploit or control us.  I felt an extreme example would be useful for everyone to consider.  

There is a second reason I wrote the novel: I had a lot of fun working with my characters and I wanted to use them to impart hope to anyone who feels that the onrush of technology is getting the better of them.

Without giving much away, what is your favorite scene from “418: I am a Teapot”? 

418: I Am a Teapot

My favorite scene is when 418 (who calls himself George) finally meets his wife Belinda (chapter 19), offline, for the first time.  Their entire relationship, even the fact that they had a family, had been conducted online.  He is surprised she does not look as she presented herself online.  He is revulsed by the way that she behaves when she is brought offline.  This is a major turning point for George in the novel he now starts to view himself as not belonging to the class of people who live online.  

This scene also underscores how ill-equipped people who have spent their lives online would be with the offline world.  They have not progressed, emotionally or intellectually, past childhood as they live in a world of make believe where, while they can be hurt, they can’t hurt themselves.  Belinda literally freaks out because she is offline.

The scene shows how George has grown since he became damaged.  He is shocked by her behavior, but it does not surprise him.  At this point, his marriage to Belinda is over, he begins to refer to her no longer as “she” but uses the more conventional “it” pronoun used for persons who live in the immersive internet.

Besides the hero of your story, which character did you enjoy building the most?

I really enjoyed building Brian’s character.  He manages George much the same way that one would manage a dump truck, a machine or any other piece of what economists would call capital equipment.  Brian is immobilized in his life by not knowing how to progress.  He is paralyzed by fear; if he stops doing what he is doing he could be forced to become like George.  He always maintains his detachment —which I have seen managers do in the IT world— but is keenly interested in how his employee acts as it might give him insight into how to break out of his own economic class.  

I particularly enjoyed that Brian asks everyone, including 418/George, to call him King.  This is Brian trying to project an image he would like onto himself, but no-one, except 418/George ever refers to him as King, and George, when he does finally learn Brian’s name, is uncomfortable not calling him King.

In order for a manager to progress, they must understand and dissolve the barriers between themselves and their staff, and Brian has to do the same.  The same insular thinking that keeps Brian away from George prevents Brian from finding a solution to his own problems, a delicious irony.

If your book is made into a Netfix movie, who do see playing the lead role? 

I always dreamed that Irrfan Kahn would play it, but sadly he was lost to the world last year.  But, I am certain there are a lot of excellent actors of South-Asian background who could pull off the deadpan humour that Brian Agarwal’s character requires.  

As far as 418/George’s character Cathel Pendred, though George is defiantly not fit and ripped like Cathel, so he will have to act soft and flabby, but his face is very close to what I’ve imagined George to look like.  It’s a bonus that Cathel is about the age that I imagine George to be (I only anticipate people living like George to live until 40-45) during the story, George should be in his early to mid-thirties.

If you could eliminate one piece of technology from your life, what would it be and why?

My cellphone.  It occupies a definite slice of my mind at any one time.  While it is stunningly convenient to be able to reach out to anyone at any time.  I do miss the naïve bliss that we used to enjoy of being, not at home, or not able to take your call / read your message.  I find the constant simulation of the cellphone to be tiring after a while. 

It should be noted, cellphones are amazing!  When I think of the processing power of the modern cellphone, the things you can do with it, it’s boggling if you stop and think about it.  A full list, while impressive is boring, it’s an amazing tool.  Being a good techie, I just have to have the latest tech and I never cease to be amazed.

Choose a movie title that best defines the story of your life.

Re-inventing Fate.

I love this concept as fate is immutable, but re-invention implies ultimate malleability.  I do believe in fate, but I do believe we get to choose our own and we can guide ourselves to our intended outcomes.  We can have whatever fate we want, it only takes a bit of re-invention.

Rapid Fire time. Answer the following questions with the first thing that comes to your mind. 

What was the last soundtrack you heard?

Mamma-Mia.

Your favourite day of the week

Friday, is there any other option? 

Computer Game or Netflix

Computer Game.

Milk Chocolate or Dark Chocolate

Dark Chocolate.

A preferred writing snack

Coffee, black.

Your biggest pet peeve is…

Apathy.

Your favorite movie of all times

Julie & Julia 

Tips to Effective Crankiness By Steven Joseph

Tips to Effective Crankiness By Steven Joseph

Have you ever wondered why so many good self-help books render ineffective? The problem with those books is the narrative – telling you what’s wrong with you and your habits. You’ll occasionally find books that help you embrace who you are and guide you to become a better version of yourself. “A Grownup Guide to Effective Crankiness: The CrankaTsuris Method” by Steven Joseph is one such book.

Timely and effective, the easy-to-follow, fun narrative is what makes this book stand apart. It also led us to want to know more about the author.

Here’s the fascinating interview with Crankiness Expert and Author Steven Joseph:

Why did you choose to write your first two books about Crankiness? 

It started out when I arrived jetlagged with my even more jetlagged sleep deprived partner on a vacation in Rome at an AIRBnB during a heat wave and a power outage in a stuffy hot dark apartment. 

A Grownup Guide to Effective Crankiness

She was a bit cranky. Under the circumstances, I had no energy to consume someone else’s cranky when I had my own cranky. 

I finally blurted out to my partner out of sheer desperation and exhaustion that she was a TyrantoCrankaTsuris, and that was how all the other bigger dinosaurs disappeared.  It was when one tiny dinosaur would not stop cranking out her tsuris (Yiddish for “problems”), and all the bigger dinosaurs ran for the hills or the bottom of the ocean.  

The CrankaTsuris was born, and we used it as a signal to each other when we got a bit cranky. It became our container.  Because of its effectiveness, I knew that I had to start writing about it.

While writing “A Grownup Guide to Effective Crankiness: The CrankaTsuris Method” what was the one goal you had in mind?

Steven Joseph's Headshot
Steven Joseph

Do you know how they announce at the end of the year that the Merriam-Webster Dictionary announces to the world that they have accepted a new word in their exclusive dictionary club?  Imagine how people would look at crankiness if CrankaTsuris was adopted as a brand-new word. 

What is the one thing you do when you get cranky?

I stick the Cranky inside my CrankaTsuris Deposit Box! 

Can you give us three tips to manage crankiness when we’re stuck in traffic?

The most important tip is that if you anticipate traffic, make sure you do not drink lots of liquids beforehand. You do not want to be sitting in traffic and then you are stuck and have to pee really badly.  Because do you know what the only cure for “Have to Pee Really Badly CrankaTsuris” is. It is called “peeing.”  And relieving “Have to Pee Really Badly CrankaTsuris” is the one of two situations that every human on the planet, whether they believe in God or not, will say the same thing.  “Oh. Thank God!!”

The second most important tip is that if you anticipate traffic is to make sure you do not load your car with little screaming children before you go out.  You do not want to be stuck in traffic with screaming kids.

This is the second situation that you finally get home exhausted, and when the kids finally fall asleep, you again exhale, and say “Thank God.” 

The first two tips leads to the third tip because if you followed Tip One and Tip Two, you can now say the following thing when you get stuck in traffic:

“At least I do not have to pee, and also, at least I do not have screaming kids in the car.”  Just sit back and enjoy!

What is the coolest thing you heard from your friends and family about your new book?

It inspired them to write a book!  Three people wrote a book because I wrote a book.  My book is giving birth to babies!!

Since you like writing stories, do you write short stories in your spare time? Where can we find them? 

I run, and the stories appear to me during a run, and I go home and copy them off my brain. They can be found on my blog at www.StevenJosephAuthor.Com.

Here are some rapid-fire questions we’d like you answer as fast as you can. Pick one.

Fiction or Non-fiction? 

Fiction.

Tea or Coffee?

Coffee.

Panda or Koala?

Koala.

Sourdough or Wheat?

Wheat.

Road trip or Cruise ship?

Road Trip.

Movies or Books? 

Books.

Be the Beauty They All Said We Could Never Be: Patrice Brown

Be the Beauty They All Said We Could Never Be: Patrice Brown

Who defines beauty? Why should big girls feel any different about their bodies than others? For ages, television shows and lifestyle brands have defined the standards of what they consider beautiful or sexy. But it is changing now. We see a gradual shift, thanks to the true influencers like Patrice Brown. Patrice chose to live her life fat, free and fabulous! She’s here to motivate you.

Here’s a candid interview with the author and founder of the “Confident Fat Girls Movement,” Patrice Brown:

Could you share a little bit about your journey leading up to the “Confident Fat Girls Movement”?

I was personally going through transition with my career and my mom dying from Cancer. I kept thinking about ways of motivating other women around me, including myself. Although i was struggling with a weight issue each day, i still felt the need to get up and do my thing. 

How does your new book “A Fat Girl’s Confidence: I’m Fat. So What?” relate to the issues young girls face today? 

Each day when any girl gets on social media we see all these perfect beautiful women, we see bullying and can feel insecure. My new book a fat girls confidence is motivational book that’s says just accept who you are even if you are different. It does not matter your size, just love you and have fun. 

In your opinion which song defines the spirit of “A Fat Girl’s Confidence” and why?

Book Cover of A Fat Girl's Confidence
A Fat Girl’s Confidence

The Spirit of a Fat Girls Confidence is Just Fine by Mary j Blidge. When she says ” When I’m walking past the mirror

Don’t stress through the night, at a time in my life

Ain’t worried about if you feel it

Got my head on straight, I got my vibe right

I ain’t gonna let you kill it

See I wouldn’t change my life, my life’s just fine

Fine, fine, fine, fine, fine, ooh!” 

That song makes you feel good no matter how you look or feel. You are just going to get up and dance. 

If you could give your book to one celebrity, who would it be and why?

I would give my book to Lizzo because she is already the representation of a fat girls movement. She is a bold woman and people love seeing her confidence across the world. She is inspiring for all plus size women because she lets nothing get in her way. 

What’s your best scar? Tell us the story behind it.

My best scar is not even about me. Its more about my sister dealing with sickness her entire life. She was born with a brain tumor and it has had a big effect on me since she was born. I have always felt like i have to defend and protect her through it all. As a child people would be rude with stares and say ugly things about my sister and her face. 

As a Mental health counselor, can you recommend a few things one try do to uplift their mood during the Pandemic?

Laughing, Listening and singing to music. Don’t forget dancing and connecting with a spiritual leaders or groups. 

Say a genie appeared to grant you three wishes. What would you ask for? (no more than 3 wishes!) 

A new home, good health with peace and happiness. 

Now, some quick-fire questions. Say the first thing that comes to you mind.

Headshot of Patrice Brown
Patrice Brown

-R&B or Hip-Hop 

Both

-Pizzas or Tapas 

Pizza

-One movie you watch over and over 

Coming to America

-You really can’t stand… 

Complaining and Begging

-Your favourite Harry Potter character 

Loud Screammmmm, I dont watch or have never read Harry Potter. lol

-Fiction or Non-fiction

Non-Fiction i enjoy books, movies or stories based on real life situations. 

-Your motto is life? 

Live life and love living no matter what.

We hope you liked this interview. Don’t forget to get your copy of A Fat Girl’s Confidence: I’m Fat. So What? today.

Kevin Groh, the darling of the German Sci-Fi market, brings his superheroes to the US market

Kevin Groh, the darling of the German Sci-Fi market, brings his superheroes to the US market

Set in a distant future and far-away galaxy, “The Commander: Guardian of the Utopia” reflects the disturbing realities of today’s world. A passionate gamer with strong moral ethics and questions about life, the young and gifted German-based Kevin Groh brings his acclaimed Omni Legends series to the sci-fi & fantasy fans in the US. While entertaining and giving readers an enjoyable experience, the book raises questions about our evolution as a species. It also acts like a mirror where you can see the reflection of the hero within you. 

Here’s how Kevin Groh started his journey of self-discovery as a sci-fi fantasy writer.

If you could give your book to one celebrity, who would it be and why?

Elon Musk – I heard he enjoys reading Sci-Fi and I would want my book to go to someone who can appreciate it and enjoy the story. Besides, the second book will feature some action on Mars and I would love to hear how he likes that part.

Give us the scoop about your book.

Every hero has an origin. Carter Sanders grew up as a privileged teen with private education. When he is drafted into the military, he has to face the harsh reality of discipline, comradery, romance, and tough training. With nothing but his instincts, he has to endure training missions and survival situations. As an actual war breaks loose, he must face involuntary body modifications that turn him into more than just a soldier. When his homeworld is under attack, he needs to make a tough choice: Should he follow his orders or save the world?

If your book was turned into a film/TV show, who would you tap to play the lead(s)? Why?

Image of the book cover by Kevin Groh
Find on Amazon

Since this book is just the beginning of a long and exciting story. The main characters are pretty young at this point so I would go with an actor that can grow with the story. I envisioned Carter like Brenton Thwaites who played Dick Grayson in DCs Titans, a character that turns from a recruit to an experienced leader. His best buddy Roderick would be someone like Ray Fisher or Michael B. Jordan. All those actors have a talent for portraying young and energetic characters as well as more experienced and battle-hardened versions of them.

Kevin, can you tell us something about you that no one else knows?

If I do that, then it won’t be a secret anymore, would it?
I do love to listen to epic orchestral music for almost any occasion – during sports, when I want to just think and brainstorm, and also when I am writing stories. Some people may call it weird but I actually prefer it to almost any other kind of music because I feel it inspires the mind.

Can you tell us three fun facts about you?

I am a German who doesn’t like beer at all.

Even though all of Germany goes crazy about soccer, I couldn’t care less about it.

I possess 7 Japanese swords, and I don’t regret a single one of them.

What makes your book unputdownable?

Q What makes your book unputdownable?

The Commander is about a very relatable character going through some very exciting adventures in a fascinating world. It has action, jokes, romance, and serious topics to think about. There is just so much happening that people won’t realize how time flies by.

What book are you currently reading, or last read?

I actually re-read the Lord of the Rings trilogy a couple of weeks ago. It is a magnificent story that I can read or watch over and over again.

Rapid Fire Questions and Answers

Q. Morning person or night owl?

A. Definitely morning person

Q. Reading or writing?

A. Writing

Q. Kittens or puppies?

A. Love puppies, allergic to kittens

Q. The city or the country?

A. I am a countryside guy

Q. Road trip or Cruise ship?

A. Cruise Ship, I love the sound of the waves

Q. Wine or beer?

A. Rum.

Q. Karaoke or bowling?

A. Bowling

Q. The ability to fly or invisibility?

A. Fly

Q. Bacon or Tofu?

A. Bacon and more bacon

Pre-order your copy of The Commander: Guardian of the Utopia by Kevin Groh today.

Surviving Remote Work Made Easy with Sharon Koifman

Surviving Remote Work Made Easy with Sharon Koifman

For some, remote work may seem like a new concept that they’re still adapting to. But some people chose remote work to fit their lifestyle way before the Pandemic hit the world. Either way, this is how most of us work today. So why not make the most of it? Sharon Koifman, CEO and Founder of DistantJob Remote Placement Agency, and author of Surviving Remote Work, shows us how.

Q. What is one lesson from Surviving Remote Work that everyone should know?

Pay attention to people’s mental health. When people go remote, they can disappear into a dark place. It’s up to both managers and fellow employees to catch each other as if they were in the office. It is the ethical things to do, and it will also help you with your bottom line

Find on Amazon

Q. If you could give Surviving Remote Work to one person in the entire world, who would it be?

Sergei Brin to reconsider the entire policy of uprooting people from where they are to join their headquarters.

Q. Have you had any bad experiences with a remote worker slacking off?

I have plenty of bad experiences with bad employees. I don’t associate it with remote. My worst experience was with a salesman hired; on the first week of training, I asked if he like our product, and his answer was, I just like the money. I like to think that I we failed in the interview even before we hired.

Q. What’s the silliest thing your kids have done that distracted you from work?

My kids like to enter my room randomly, and I refuse to put on a lock. I guess as frustrating as it is, I do enjoy the visit. Often, my older one likes to come, sit on my lap, take over my headset and have a conversation with whoever is on the other side. She is really cute and is a great communicator, so no one seems to mind. Unfortunately, or fortunately, this happened in the middle of a podcast interview, and she was wearing the cutest thing, and the interviewer just starting chatting with her during the podcast. She is really lucky she is so cute.

Sharon Koifman

Q. Tell us something about YOU that know one else knows.

I think that you know that I know that you know that I know, that this is probably not a reasonable question, considering that your friends and wife would kill me if you found something first from an online interview, but let me try to play along.  While most people assume I’m a big scotch drinker, my favorite drink is sake. 😊

Q. What’s the funniest thing to happen during a Zoom meeting?

I always find it amusing when I get stuck in a situation with horrible latency. Once in a blue moon, I get a 5 seconds delay, which brings the conversation to a different level of awkwardness. It a bit strange yet so amusing when you make a joke and don’t yet realize the massive latency. One time I chatted with a client where we had approximately 7 seconds latency. So you can imagine when I made a joke not yet realizing the horrible latency. The person on the other side just had a serious face, not even acknowledging I made a joke, making me think my sense of humor is completely off. Then 7 seconds later, that seemed like a lifetime in joke time, he starts cracking up for about a minute.  This was the most awkward comedy routine I have ever had.

Q. What do you love about remote working? What do you hate?

What their not to love? No traffic, seeing my family, no time-wasting, setting up my office the way I like.
The hate is a bit more challenging, but I feel I missed on the experience of going for a happy hour after work with your colleagues.

Rapid Fire Questions and Answers

Q. Morning person or night owl?

morning

Q. Coffee or RedBull?

Tea?

Q. Suit and Tie or Sweatshirt?

Suit no tie, in such disconnected times; it’s nice to feel like a professional

Q. Desktop or Laptop?

Desktop

Q. Movie night with the Family or fun night out?

Fun night out

Q. The ability to fly or invisibility?

Invisibility

Q. Visiting the Ocean or camping by a lake?

Ocean

Q. Eminem or Snoop Dog?

Do I sound like a snob if I don’t consider rap real music? I guess I would go with Eminem. He seems to rap faster.

Q. Selfie or Group Photo

Group  photo

Order a copy of Surviving Remote work on Amazon.