What to Expect in Moonlighting: An Oral History by Scott Ryan

What to Expect in Moonlighting: An Oral History by Scott Ryan

If you’re someone who devours new television shows, are the go-to person for recommendations among your friends, and want to hold your fame, you’ve got to read this. You’re about to earn some serious brownie points by being the first to know all about the 80s iconic show, Moonlighting. Here’s a little chat with pop culture storyteller and television historian Scott Ryan.

Hi Scott, your latest book, “Moonlighting: An Oral History,” still holds its position on the top 50 Television History & Criticism books on Amazon since its release. Congratulations!

How’s the overall response so far? 

It has been incredible. I have been getting emails almost every other day from fans of the series. I always put my email in the back of all my books and say that if you have a kind email to send, send it. I do not have interest in the mean ones. Most bookstores have not been carrying the book, so we need more stores to jump on the eighties bandwagon.

Why did you choose to write about Moonlighting?

 I have always been amazed that no one had ever written a book about it.  I have wanted to write this book for years. Finally, two years ago, Glenn Caron gave me his blessing and I ran with it.

Would you say this book is mainly for those who are fans of the show?

Well, you are asking the author. No author would say his book is for less people. But I honestly believe this book should be read by all television lovers. This will really explain to viewers how hard it is to create a piece of art. And how much harder it is to make a quality piece of art. I have had many interviewers tell me that they never saw an episode of the series, but they loved the book.

What can you share about “Moonlighting: An Oral History” that will resonate with today’s television viewers and potential readers?

I think they will get a look at how Moonlighting changed the way TV was made and produced. It is also a great reminder at how viewers want TV that challenges them. That making average TV should be thought of as the greatest crime. There is a really amazing story in this book. I was lucky to get to tell it.

Can you share some of your fanboy moments from your time meeting and interviewing some of Moonlighting’s cast/crew members? 

Look, I got to watch an episode of Moonlighting with Cybill Shepherd. We watched over zoom together. I will never forget that my entire life. Jay Daniel produced Roseanne, Moonlighting, Cybill and he is now one of my dear friends. I have been blessed to talk to the very  people that inspired me to be a writer. I will never get over how my life and their lives  intersected. This entire process has been a dream for me.

What’s the one thing you learned about Moonlighting that bowled you over?

That the network just let them spend as much money as they wanted. There was no one on set telling them to finish an episode, or cut a scene or anything. They were just left alone because the ratings were so good. I also finally figured out exactly how they filmed Season 4. I have never understood why they didn’t have Cybill and Bruce in scenes together, but they are in every episode. It just didn’t make sense. It took lots of interviews to piece together the filming sequences. But I think readers will love the answer to that question. I am not telling you, though. You’ll have to read the book.

Aside from Moonlighting, what are some of your favorite binge-able shows of all time? 

Well Twin Peaks and thirtysomething have always been my favorite. I also love anything by David E. Kelley. Right now, I love Hacks on HBO, Good Fight on Paramount + and Ted Lasso on Apple +, but my goodness, who can afford to buy all those platforms. Just forget it and read my book.

Ready for some rapid-fire questions? Here we go:

Morning person or a night owl 

Morning person (that kills me to say that now)

Television shows or movies 

TV all the way

Movie theatre or streaming at home

 Streaming, I don’t need to hear a stranger’s comments on the film. I am fine.

Popcorn or Nachos

 Nachos and piled so high they are messy.

Night Court or Family Ties

 WOW. This is an amazing question and a stumper. It is basically even, but I was so in love with Mallory, that FT has to win. But great question.

A preferred writing snack

 Grapes. I know that sounds weird, but I love to stop and start when I am writing. I adore getting up and getting something. So I love for it to be grapes. You write a few paragraphs, then you go to the fridge, get a grape and go back and sit down and then rinse and repeat.

What was the last movie you watched?

 Jackie Brown. Which will give you a hint at what I want my next book to be about. The Movies of Tarantino.

Solving Mysteries in Real-Life and Fiction: T L Bequette

Solving Mysteries in Real-Life and Fiction: T L Bequette

Hi T L Bequette, congrats on your first novel, “Good Lookin’: A Joe Turner Mystery.” We’re so excited to hear more about you and the book. Let’s get to it.

As a criminal defense attorney, your practice involves defending accused murderers. How did you shift gears and decide to write fiction?

I’ve always loved to write creatively. As an attorney, I have plenty of opportunities to write, but creativity is generally frowned upon. You can’t make up the law, after all. So, when I finally stopped making excuses and started writing, it was a wonderful feeling—like seeing an old friend for the first time in years.

How did Joe Turner start to take shape in your mind? When did you know you had to get the story out there? 

I’ve practiced criminal defense for nearly thirty years, so my job has given me quite a trove of real-life tales that are often crazier than fiction. Also, a significant part of the book follows the exploits of twin boys. As a father of teenage twins, I’ve gained some insight there as well. They would disagree, by the way

Book cover of Good Lookin' by T L Bequette
Available on Amazon

In “Good Lookin’: A Joe Turner Mystery,” how much of it would you say is fiction and how much of it is derived from real life? 

The protagonist, Joe Turner is a criminal defense attorney like me. When faced with defending a client who is actually innocent, he stresses out and drinks too much. Also, a bit like me, I suppose. Joe is also a smartass and very witty—like I would be if I could magically stop conversations and take lots of time to think of great lines.

If you weren’t a criminal defense attorney, would you still write a crime mystery? Do you want to explore other genres?

That’s a great question. I’ve thought about other genres, but I have so much material and stories yet to tell, I think mysteries will keep me busy for a while.

If you have a chance to partner with Netflix, who would you like cast for as Joe Turner? 

Kyle Chandler, I think. He’s likeable.

Besides the real-life observations, where do you draw your inspiration from?

In my genre, Louise Penny is a wonderful writer. Also, you can’t beat John Grisham for storytelling.

Without giving much away, can you think of the one scene that made you go, “Ah, this is perfect!” 

Is it okay to have two? The first involves an abusive bully. Spoiler alert, I suppose, but let’s just say I enjoyed writing the resolution of that part of the story. Also, there is one final twist in the very last line of the book. I think it’s cool.

T. L. Bequette

Here are some rapid-fire questions for you. Answer with the first thought that comes to your mind. Ready? Let’s go. 

Tea or Coffee

Coffee

‘Rear Window’ or ‘L.A. Confidential’

Rear Window

Jazz or Country Music

Country

Prefer writing in the morning or late at night

Early am

Video Game or Movie

Movie

What’s the one thing you learned when writing the book? 

That organization — keeping plot lines and characters straight — is an underrated part of writing.

Tell us one thing about yourself that we likely don’t know. 

I once worked in the largest prune dehydrator in the world.

Explore the Immersive Dystopia of the Internet With Edgar Scott

Explore the Immersive Dystopia of the Internet With Edgar Scott

Technology and innovation drive our society towards a better tomorrow. But, what if someone misused the inventions? Edgar Scott presents a case of technology gone wrong in his upcoming dystopian sci-fi novel, “418: I Am a Teapot.” But is there light at the end of the tunnel? We’re about to find out.

Edgar Scott shares his technical insights, personal views, and scoops from 418 in a candid interview.

What does the title, “418: I am a Teapot” mean and how does it relate to theme of the book?

The title 418 actually refers to an HTTP response code.  While its introduction was originally an April Fool’s joke, the “418 I’m a Teapot” response is usually ignored by web browsers; unlike a “404 Not Found” response.  A crafty network admin may configure a server to issue a 418 response which allows the visitor to use the site while the 418 response is recorded in the server logs for programmers to analyze.  

In today’s internet, we often program web services to have different roles, authentication, handling tokens, access data sources in addition to rendering HTML.  Often what appears to be an entire web server is little more than a program written to respond to specific requests.  In the novel “418: I am a teapot” we have immersive internet, which implies programmability.  A practical aspect of 418’s world is that, to pay for being on the internet 24/7, we have to be programmed to carry out tasks.  Happily, if we are in the immersive internet, we won’t even be aware what we are doing; we don’t need any skill to do what we are programmed to do and are paid accordingly. 

In such a world, where you are not even aware of what we do, we might as well be a teapot. In fact, our protagonist, may have actually been a virtual teapot or a proverbial coffee maker, without even knowing it.

Why did you choose to write a dystopian sci-fi novel?

Edgar Scott

Having watched new technology, which normally improves our lives, think of all the truly mind shattering things that we can now do with computers, mobile devices, wearable tech.  I can tell if my heart is beating properly, I know exactly how long my morning run was or how to avoid getting stuck in traffic.  While I love new technology, coding, and toying with computers, I wanted to issue a warning that not always is everything as rosy as it appears at first blush.  I felt compelled to write this novel because technology can be abused.  It could be used to exploit or control us.  I felt an extreme example would be useful for everyone to consider.  

There is a second reason I wrote the novel: I had a lot of fun working with my characters and I wanted to use them to impart hope to anyone who feels that the onrush of technology is getting the better of them.

Without giving much away, what is your favorite scene from “418: I am a Teapot”? 

418: I Am a Teapot

My favorite scene is when 418 (who calls himself George) finally meets his wife Belinda (chapter 19), offline, for the first time.  Their entire relationship, even the fact that they had a family, had been conducted online.  He is surprised she does not look as she presented herself online.  He is revulsed by the way that she behaves when she is brought offline.  This is a major turning point for George in the novel he now starts to view himself as not belonging to the class of people who live online.  

This scene also underscores how ill-equipped people who have spent their lives online would be with the offline world.  They have not progressed, emotionally or intellectually, past childhood as they live in a world of make believe where, while they can be hurt, they can’t hurt themselves.  Belinda literally freaks out because she is offline.

The scene shows how George has grown since he became damaged.  He is shocked by her behavior, but it does not surprise him.  At this point, his marriage to Belinda is over, he begins to refer to her no longer as “she” but uses the more conventional “it” pronoun used for persons who live in the immersive internet.

Besides the hero of your story, which character did you enjoy building the most?

I really enjoyed building Brian’s character.  He manages George much the same way that one would manage a dump truck, a machine or any other piece of what economists would call capital equipment.  Brian is immobilized in his life by not knowing how to progress.  He is paralyzed by fear; if he stops doing what he is doing he could be forced to become like George.  He always maintains his detachment —which I have seen managers do in the IT world— but is keenly interested in how his employee acts as it might give him insight into how to break out of his own economic class.  

I particularly enjoyed that Brian asks everyone, including 418/George, to call him King.  This is Brian trying to project an image he would like onto himself, but no-one, except 418/George ever refers to him as King, and George, when he does finally learn Brian’s name, is uncomfortable not calling him King.

In order for a manager to progress, they must understand and dissolve the barriers between themselves and their staff, and Brian has to do the same.  The same insular thinking that keeps Brian away from George prevents Brian from finding a solution to his own problems, a delicious irony.

If your book is made into a Netfix movie, who do see playing the lead role? 

I always dreamed that Irrfan Kahn would play it, but sadly he was lost to the world last year.  But, I am certain there are a lot of excellent actors of South-Asian background who could pull off the deadpan humour that Brian Agarwal’s character requires.  

As far as 418/George’s character Cathel Pendred, though George is defiantly not fit and ripped like Cathel, so he will have to act soft and flabby, but his face is very close to what I’ve imagined George to look like.  It’s a bonus that Cathel is about the age that I imagine George to be (I only anticipate people living like George to live until 40-45) during the story, George should be in his early to mid-thirties.

If you could eliminate one piece of technology from your life, what would it be and why?

My cellphone.  It occupies a definite slice of my mind at any one time.  While it is stunningly convenient to be able to reach out to anyone at any time.  I do miss the naïve bliss that we used to enjoy of being, not at home, or not able to take your call / read your message.  I find the constant simulation of the cellphone to be tiring after a while. 

It should be noted, cellphones are amazing!  When I think of the processing power of the modern cellphone, the things you can do with it, it’s boggling if you stop and think about it.  A full list, while impressive is boring, it’s an amazing tool.  Being a good techie, I just have to have the latest tech and I never cease to be amazed.

Choose a movie title that best defines the story of your life.

Re-inventing Fate.

I love this concept as fate is immutable, but re-invention implies ultimate malleability.  I do believe in fate, but I do believe we get to choose our own and we can guide ourselves to our intended outcomes.  We can have whatever fate we want, it only takes a bit of re-invention.

Rapid Fire time. Answer the following questions with the first thing that comes to your mind. 

What was the last soundtrack you heard?

Mamma-Mia.

Your favourite day of the week

Friday, is there any other option? 

Computer Game or Netflix

Computer Game.

Milk Chocolate or Dark Chocolate

Dark Chocolate.

A preferred writing snack

Coffee, black.

Your biggest pet peeve is…

Apathy.

Your favorite movie of all times

Julie & Julia 

Tips to Effective Crankiness By Steven Joseph

Tips to Effective Crankiness By Steven Joseph

Have you ever wondered why so many good self-help books render ineffective? The problem with those books is the narrative – telling you what’s wrong with you and your habits. You’ll occasionally find books that help you embrace who you are and guide you to become a better version of yourself. “A Grownup Guide to Effective Crankiness: The CrankaTsuris Method” by Steven Joseph is one such book.

Timely and effective, the easy-to-follow, fun narrative is what makes this book stand apart. It also led us to want to know more about the author.

Here’s the fascinating interview with Crankiness Expert and Author Steven Joseph:

Why did you choose to write your first two books about Crankiness? 

It started out when I arrived jetlagged with my even more jetlagged sleep deprived partner on a vacation in Rome at an AIRBnB during a heat wave and a power outage in a stuffy hot dark apartment. 

A Grownup Guide to Effective Crankiness

She was a bit cranky. Under the circumstances, I had no energy to consume someone else’s cranky when I had my own cranky. 

I finally blurted out to my partner out of sheer desperation and exhaustion that she was a TyrantoCrankaTsuris, and that was how all the other bigger dinosaurs disappeared.  It was when one tiny dinosaur would not stop cranking out her tsuris (Yiddish for “problems”), and all the bigger dinosaurs ran for the hills or the bottom of the ocean.  

The CrankaTsuris was born, and we used it as a signal to each other when we got a bit cranky. It became our container.  Because of its effectiveness, I knew that I had to start writing about it.

While writing “A Grownup Guide to Effective Crankiness: The CrankaTsuris Method” what was the one goal you had in mind?

Steven Joseph's Headshot
Steven Joseph

Do you know how they announce at the end of the year that the Merriam-Webster Dictionary announces to the world that they have accepted a new word in their exclusive dictionary club?  Imagine how people would look at crankiness if CrankaTsuris was adopted as a brand-new word. 

What is the one thing you do when you get cranky?

I stick the Cranky inside my CrankaTsuris Deposit Box! 

Can you give us three tips to manage crankiness when we’re stuck in traffic?

The most important tip is that if you anticipate traffic, make sure you do not drink lots of liquids beforehand. You do not want to be sitting in traffic and then you are stuck and have to pee really badly.  Because do you know what the only cure for “Have to Pee Really Badly CrankaTsuris” is. It is called “peeing.”  And relieving “Have to Pee Really Badly CrankaTsuris” is the one of two situations that every human on the planet, whether they believe in God or not, will say the same thing.  “Oh. Thank God!!”

The second most important tip is that if you anticipate traffic is to make sure you do not load your car with little screaming children before you go out.  You do not want to be stuck in traffic with screaming kids.

This is the second situation that you finally get home exhausted, and when the kids finally fall asleep, you again exhale, and say “Thank God.” 

The first two tips leads to the third tip because if you followed Tip One and Tip Two, you can now say the following thing when you get stuck in traffic:

“At least I do not have to pee, and also, at least I do not have screaming kids in the car.”  Just sit back and enjoy!

What is the coolest thing you heard from your friends and family about your new book?

It inspired them to write a book!  Three people wrote a book because I wrote a book.  My book is giving birth to babies!!

Since you like writing stories, do you write short stories in your spare time? Where can we find them? 

I run, and the stories appear to me during a run, and I go home and copy them off my brain. They can be found on my blog at www.StevenJosephAuthor.Com.

Here are some rapid-fire questions we’d like you answer as fast as you can. Pick one.

Fiction or Non-fiction? 

Fiction.

Tea or Coffee?

Coffee.

Panda or Koala?

Koala.

Sourdough or Wheat?

Wheat.

Road trip or Cruise ship?

Road Trip.

Movies or Books? 

Books.

Be the Beauty They All Said We Could Never Be: Patrice Brown

Be the Beauty They All Said We Could Never Be: Patrice Brown

Who defines beauty? Why should big girls feel any different about their bodies than others? For ages, television shows and lifestyle brands have defined the standards of what they consider beautiful or sexy. But it is changing now. We see a gradual shift, thanks to the true influencers like Patrice Brown. Patrice chose to live her life fat, free and fabulous! She’s here to motivate you.

Here’s a candid interview with the author and founder of the “Confident Fat Girls Movement,” Patrice Brown:

Could you share a little bit about your journey leading up to the “Confident Fat Girls Movement”?

I was personally going through transition with my career and my mom dying from Cancer. I kept thinking about ways of motivating other women around me, including myself. Although i was struggling with a weight issue each day, i still felt the need to get up and do my thing. 

How does your new book “A Fat Girl’s Confidence: I’m Fat. So What?” relate to the issues young girls face today? 

Each day when any girl gets on social media we see all these perfect beautiful women, we see bullying and can feel insecure. My new book a fat girls confidence is motivational book that’s says just accept who you are even if you are different. It does not matter your size, just love you and have fun. 

In your opinion which song defines the spirit of “A Fat Girl’s Confidence” and why?

Book Cover of A Fat Girl's Confidence
A Fat Girl’s Confidence

The Spirit of a Fat Girls Confidence is Just Fine by Mary j Blidge. When she says ” When I’m walking past the mirror

Don’t stress through the night, at a time in my life

Ain’t worried about if you feel it

Got my head on straight, I got my vibe right

I ain’t gonna let you kill it

See I wouldn’t change my life, my life’s just fine

Fine, fine, fine, fine, fine, ooh!” 

That song makes you feel good no matter how you look or feel. You are just going to get up and dance. 

If you could give your book to one celebrity, who would it be and why?

I would give my book to Lizzo because she is already the representation of a fat girls movement. She is a bold woman and people love seeing her confidence across the world. She is inspiring for all plus size women because she lets nothing get in her way. 

What’s your best scar? Tell us the story behind it.

My best scar is not even about me. Its more about my sister dealing with sickness her entire life. She was born with a brain tumor and it has had a big effect on me since she was born. I have always felt like i have to defend and protect her through it all. As a child people would be rude with stares and say ugly things about my sister and her face. 

As a Mental health counselor, can you recommend a few things one try do to uplift their mood during the Pandemic?

Laughing, Listening and singing to music. Don’t forget dancing and connecting with a spiritual leaders or groups. 

Say a genie appeared to grant you three wishes. What would you ask for? (no more than 3 wishes!) 

A new home, good health with peace and happiness. 

Now, some quick-fire questions. Say the first thing that comes to you mind.

Headshot of Patrice Brown
Patrice Brown

-R&B or Hip-Hop 

Both

-Pizzas or Tapas 

Pizza

-One movie you watch over and over 

Coming to America

-You really can’t stand… 

Complaining and Begging

-Your favourite Harry Potter character 

Loud Screammmmm, I dont watch or have never read Harry Potter. lol

-Fiction or Non-fiction

Non-Fiction i enjoy books, movies or stories based on real life situations. 

-Your motto is life? 

Live life and love living no matter what.

We hope you liked this interview. Don’t forget to get your copy of A Fat Girl’s Confidence: I’m Fat. So What? today.

Kevin Groh, the darling of the German Sci-Fi market, brings his superheroes to the US market

Kevin Groh, the darling of the German Sci-Fi market, brings his superheroes to the US market

Set in a distant future and far-away galaxy, “The Commander: Guardian of the Utopia” reflects the disturbing realities of today’s world. A passionate gamer with strong moral ethics and questions about life, the young and gifted German-based Kevin Groh brings his acclaimed Omni Legends series to the sci-fi & fantasy fans in the US. While entertaining and giving readers an enjoyable experience, the book raises questions about our evolution as a species. It also acts like a mirror where you can see the reflection of the hero within you. 

Here’s how Kevin Groh started his journey of self-discovery as a sci-fi fantasy writer.

If you could give your book to one celebrity, who would it be and why?

Elon Musk – I heard he enjoys reading Sci-Fi and I would want my book to go to someone who can appreciate it and enjoy the story. Besides, the second book will feature some action on Mars and I would love to hear how he likes that part.

Give us the scoop about your book.

Every hero has an origin. Carter Sanders grew up as a privileged teen with private education. When he is drafted into the military, he has to face the harsh reality of discipline, comradery, romance, and tough training. With nothing but his instincts, he has to endure training missions and survival situations. As an actual war breaks loose, he must face involuntary body modifications that turn him into more than just a soldier. When his homeworld is under attack, he needs to make a tough choice: Should he follow his orders or save the world?

If your book was turned into a film/TV show, who would you tap to play the lead(s)? Why?

Image of the book cover by Kevin Groh
Find on Amazon

Since this book is just the beginning of a long and exciting story. The main characters are pretty young at this point so I would go with an actor that can grow with the story. I envisioned Carter like Brenton Thwaites who played Dick Grayson in DCs Titans, a character that turns from a recruit to an experienced leader. His best buddy Roderick would be someone like Ray Fisher or Michael B. Jordan. All those actors have a talent for portraying young and energetic characters as well as more experienced and battle-hardened versions of them.

Kevin, can you tell us something about you that no one else knows?

If I do that, then it won’t be a secret anymore, would it?
I do love to listen to epic orchestral music for almost any occasion – during sports, when I want to just think and brainstorm, and also when I am writing stories. Some people may call it weird but I actually prefer it to almost any other kind of music because I feel it inspires the mind.

Can you tell us three fun facts about you?

I am a German who doesn’t like beer at all.

Even though all of Germany goes crazy about soccer, I couldn’t care less about it.

I possess 7 Japanese swords, and I don’t regret a single one of them.

What makes your book unputdownable?

Q What makes your book unputdownable?

The Commander is about a very relatable character going through some very exciting adventures in a fascinating world. It has action, jokes, romance, and serious topics to think about. There is just so much happening that people won’t realize how time flies by.

What book are you currently reading, or last read?

I actually re-read the Lord of the Rings trilogy a couple of weeks ago. It is a magnificent story that I can read or watch over and over again.

Rapid Fire Questions and Answers

Q. Morning person or night owl?

A. Definitely morning person

Q. Reading or writing?

A. Writing

Q. Kittens or puppies?

A. Love puppies, allergic to kittens

Q. The city or the country?

A. I am a countryside guy

Q. Road trip or Cruise ship?

A. Cruise Ship, I love the sound of the waves

Q. Wine or beer?

A. Rum.

Q. Karaoke or bowling?

A. Bowling

Q. The ability to fly or invisibility?

A. Fly

Q. Bacon or Tofu?

A. Bacon and more bacon

Pre-order your copy of The Commander: Guardian of the Utopia by Kevin Groh today.